Southwest Brewing News December 2012/January 2013 : Page 1

ARE YOU WEARING? Thirteen Years of Quality TAPS Brewmaster Victor Novak (center) with TAPS Brea team members Shinnie Pao (l) and Rene Hernandez (r). By David Mulvihill PHOTOS BY DAVID MULVIHILL. By Bev Blackwood II ABOVE AND RIGHT-Great American Beer Festival regalia. BELOW-The Saint Arnold “Hopwaiian” shirt identifies members of the Saint Arnold Army at events like the GABF. PHOTO BY AND COURTESY OF STEVEN KOLODZIEJ PHOTOS BY MIKE JOHNSON. ore than a brewpub, this upscale seafood chophouse offers a variety of experiences within its confines. You may opt for white linen dining or enjoy the same fine fare in the more m casual setting of the extensive bar area w while watching your favorite sporting events. The best of both worlds, ,g along with a shuck hand view of the freshest oysters available awaits you at the oyster bar. In 1991, 199 Joe Manzella and family, owners of The Catch Ca Restaurant in Anaheim, opened TAPS Fish House and Brewery, in Brea, Calif. Cal With Brewmaster Victor Novak at a the brewhouse helm, TAPS has garnered numerous GABF GA and World Beer Cup awards, including Brewpub aw Group Brewer/Brewery of G the t Year the past two years. TAPS added two more T GABF Medals in October. G A knowledgeable waitstaff readily read assists with beer and See TAPS p. 4 ay the words “beer fashion” to yourself and what comes to mind? Probably one of three things: your favorite brewery T-shirt, one of those puffy fabric or inflatable beer stein hats, or a German woman in a dirndl carrying a fistful of maßkrugs. You might even pair the woman with a smiling German man in lederhosen, the traditional leather pants worn to Oktoberfest. Maybe you’re thinking of someone dressed as a monk you saw at a beer festival. Let’s face it, when it comes to our favorite beverage, what you’re wearing is seldom as important as what is in the glass, although often what you wear can help you carry that glass. In this discussion, modern beer fashion primarily boils down to three categories: advertising a beer, carrying a beer and opening a beer. INSIDE State by State News From the Editor ..................2 Event Calendar ...................9 Best of Show .....................6 Directories & Maps ........12-15 Arkansas .............. 8 Oklahoma ............ 9 New Mexico ........10 Nevada ...............16 S. California .......16 San Diego ...........17 S/C/E Texas ........18 Austin .................19 N & W Texas .......21 C. Arizona .......... 22 S. & N. Arizona ... 23 See Wearing p. 5

What Beer

Bev Blackwood II

ARE YOU WEARING?

Say the words “beer fashion” to yourself and what comes to mind? Probably one of three things: your favorite brewery T-shirt, one of those puffy fabric or inflatable beer stein hats, or a German woman in a dirndl carrying a fistful of maßkrugs. You might even pair the woman with a smiling German man in lederhosen, the traditional leather pants worn to Oktoberfest. Maybe you’re thinking of someone dressed as a monk you saw at a beer festival. Let’s face it, when it comes to our favorite beverage, what you’re wearing is seldom as important as what is in the glass, although often what you wear can help you carry that glass.

In this discussion, modern beer fashion primarily boils down to three categories: advertising a beer, carrying a beer and opening a beer.

Show It

When it comes to advertising a beer, that’s where creativity and design really have an impact on the overall fashion statement. Ranging from a simple logo on a shirt to more exotic items like bicycle jerseys where vivid and stylish designs rule the day, these items tend to be variations on everyday clothing items for casual wear or sports. Even so, certain clothing items stand out, such as the Saint Arnold “Hopwaiian” shirt, which has gone through many iterations since its introduction back in 2001. Every year, there’s a cadre of Hopwaiian-wearing Saint Arnold Army members at the GABF. The philosophy of the shirt is simple enough, since Houston is a hot and humid place, a loose fitting and airy shirt is simply more comfortable. Similarly, West Coast breweries like Stone Brewing in San Diego offer more hoodies and sweatshirts for the days when the breeze off the Pacific gets a little chilly. Practical matters aside, you can also dress from head to toes at Stone, from caps to fun items like cycling socks where the “Fizzy Yellow Beer” is appropriately trod underfoot. Even infants can display their parental beer preferences with many breweries offering onesies featuring company logos.

Accessorize It

Carrying a beer is a bit more challenging than simply printing a logo on something, and the spirit of invention rules the day. In a social setting, you might need to carry your beer, a plate, and still have a free hand to eat. That’s where a number of beer-carrying innovations come into play. Nearly everyone has seen the beer helmet, a plastic hard hat that features two side-mounted can holders and a long straw to access them both. However, they don’t stop there, as there’s the Holster Up beer holster, which can be strapped to your waist (sorry, just a single shooter, not a six) and the Beer Buckle, for the Western set, that features a wire-rimmed platform where you can place an open can or bottle. (One cannot help but wonder about the potential embarrassing consequences of a spill there though.) If you’re drinking from a glass, try out the Beer Caddy, a necklace that provides a ring to hold your beer glass around your neck.

If the beer isn’t open, then it becomes more a matter of storage over style, as the Hops Holster demonstrates, a bandoliertype shoulder strap made for carrying as many as 12 cans of your favorite craft brew. (Keeping them cold would appear to be an issue though.) If you’re truly delicate, or it’s exceptionally cold outside, you can also wear a Sküüzi, a knit beer mitten from Scandinavia that insulates your hand from both the cold beer and any chilly weather. Similarly, there’s a beer hoodie from Brew City that incorporates a beer pocket between the regular ones for your hands. Of course, if you’re trying to be surreptitious, there’s always the Beer Belly, a bladder worn on your stomach, which can be filled with the frothy beverage of your choice. No word on whether it also keeps you cool on a hot summer’s day.

So you have your beer, but can’t find that opener… What to do, what to do? You could always use your head - or at least the hat on it. There are several designs for bottle opener caps, which incorporate the opener into the bill. The world’s thinnest bottle opener, the Bottle Mate, is a credit card-size piece of stainless steel that you can slip into your wallet. Don’t have a pocket? Then the stainless steel Beer Opener Ring from Urban Outfitters will make you very “handy!” You could also use the opener found on your pair of Reef Sandals, which incorporate an opener into the sole of the shoe. If you’re barefoot (and a woman) there are also two kinds of bikinis featuring buckles that also double as an opener.

Just Wear It

Of course, you may simply want to express your enthusiasm for your container of choice. For you, there are hats of varying sizes in the shapes of beer mugs or bottles, or even full body costumes in the shape of bottles or cans. Need some shades? Why not the classic beer goggles? These little mugs are worn over the eyes, which can’t help but magnify the effect your beer is already having. If you want to slow down that effect with a snack, don’t forget your pretzel necklace. Experiment and find your beer fashion sense, and then be proud to display it. From the timeworn to the latest trends, beer fashion is never really out of fashion, as long as it’s worn in moderation!

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/What+Beer/1270095/140074/article.html.

Thirteen Years Of Quality TAPS

David Mulvihill

More than a brewpub, this upscale seafood chophouse offers a variety of experiences within its confines. You may opt for white linen dining or enjoy the same fine fare in the more casual setting of the extensive bar area while watching your favorite sporting events. The best of both worlds, along with a shuck hand view of the freshest oysters available awaits you at the oyster bar. In 1991, joe manzella and family owners of The Catch restaurant in Anaheim, opened TAPS Fish House and Brewery, in Brea, Calif. With Brewmaster Vicor Novak at the brewhouse helm, TAPS has garnered numerous GABF and World Beer Cup awards, including brewpub group brewer/brewery of the year the past two years. TAPS added two more GABE medals in october. A knoweledge waitstaff readily assists with beer and menu decisions. This successful mix led to opening TAPS second location in Corona in 2007.

Background of a Master

“I went to UC Berkley back in the ‘80s and studied political geography… looking at current political problems and their roots,” shared Novak. “It gave me a nice perspective on looking at the world.” After completing an internship at Harvard, it became clear to Novak that progression in this field would require an advanced degree. In 1992, still pondering his next steps, Novak accompanied his girlfriend to Philadelphia where she was to attend grad school. They soon found that a lack of craft beer in Pennsylvania necessitated bottle runs to Maryland and Washington, D.C., and risk of getting caught crossing state lines. An alternative arose when Novak’s girlfriend bought him a homebrew kit for Christmas and he began homebrewing. Novak described the brewing epiphany that followed, “I read Michael Jackson’s “World Guide to Beer.” It had history, culture, tradition, everything I loved about the Bay Area and my major. I said, ‘This is what I want to do.’” He went to work for Dock Street Brewing Company in June 1993. “I waited tables, bartended, and apprenticed my way into the brewery. I worked under Nick Fennell, who came from British breweries, and Will Kemper was the first Dock Street brewer, brewing all those great German ales and lagers - all that beautiful stuff!”

A change in Pennsylvania law, coupled with an imminent reduction in brewing staff, prompted Novak’s return to California in 1997. A Philly connection would lead to Novak’s introduction to TAPS owner Joe Manzella. Former Dock Street co-worker, David Smith, was contracted as the Project Manager for TAPS brewery build-out. He ordered the brewhouse from Liquid Assets. Sonnet Goodenough, also a Dock Street alum, was working for her father’s company, Liquid Assets. Both recommended Novak.

Carrying the Torch

Novak attributes his early training and foundation in classic beers to his consistency and success. “Ninety to 95% of what we brew are classic styles.” TAPS rotates about 50 brews each year. The list comprises many classics, but also a mix of West Coast creations, including TAPS IPA and Cali Gold, their hoppy pale.

What is vital to Novak when brewing? “Balance; it’s become a marketing cliché, but it’s always been a hallmark for what TAPS has done for 13 years.” He also believes true classic flavors can only be attained by using genuine yeast strains. He sees the fundamental importance of yeast character, or the lack of yeast character, in the many beers he brews. For breweries that utilize a single strain, you begin to understand why their beers start tasting the same. Novak banks up to 12 different strains including his own proprietary strain he uses for Burton Ale. His Burton strain was also used for the recent TAPS/ Bruery collaboration, A Steins Throw.

Novak and his talented brewers manage the beer taps for Corona (eight taps), Brea (12 taps) and The Catch (20 taps with three or four TAPS brews). They expect to brew 2,500 – 2,700 barrels this year. Approximately 750 barrels will be for distribution. Head Brewer David Huls and Assistant Brewer Erik Zwack started in mid-June, shortly after Evan Price left for the head brewer spot at Noble Ale Works. Former offensive lineman for Oregon State, Huls came to TAPS from Gordon Biersch in Plano, Texas. “To have another lager guy with that great training has been fantastic!” Novak asserted. Zwack, an avid homebrewer, enthusiastic and knowledgeable, came from MoreBeer in Riverside, Calif. He has been a great addition to the team. Brewer Kyle Smith, formerly at BJ’s West Covina, has been with TAPS since early 2010. TAPS inaugural imperial IPA, Poseidon, was Smith’s creation.

Going Forward

What’s in store for TAPS? Core focus will always be on their restaurants, followed by gradual sustained growth in distribution. At some point, an offsite production brewery may also be feasible. TAPS is currently redesigning their logo to enhance outside market recognition. Watch for new tap handles PHOTO BY DAVID MULVIHILL. With wrought iron features.

They’ll continue with the classics and play with new ones. Novak collaborated with Jeff Dugan of Portola Coffee to formulate Imperial Balinese Stout, which blended Bali Kintamani and Javanese coffees with Maris Otter malt, resulting in chocolate ganache flavors with a touch of sweetness. A white IPA is also in the works. Look for a classic Belgian wit with a hoppy IPA twist. TAPS will also continue to hold their annual summer beer festival in Corona. This combination food and beer event features delectable chef creations and brews from 25 Southern California breweries.

In closing, Novak reflected on what makes TAPS. “We do a lot of different styles, but, in addition to that, I think the thing that separates us is having a nice dining experience - steak, crab legs, lobster tail, Ahi, salmon… not just pizza and salads. In more of that European tradition you can get great food and pair it with a fine beer. When you let your palate play, it’s only going to make what you do better.”

GETTING THERE

TAPS Fish House and Brewery
www.tapsfishhouse.com
101 E Imperial Hwy, Brea, CA 92821
714-257-0101
2745 Lakeshore Drive, Corona, CA 92883
951-277-5800

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Thirteen+Years+Of+Quality+TAPS/1270096/140074/article.html.

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