Southwest Brewing News December 2013/January 2014 : Page 1

Stone Brewing Company CEO & Co-Founder Greg Koch (middle) with friends at one of the many Stone sponsored events. PHOTO BY DAVID MULVIHILL. (R) Kendra of Santa Fe Brewing pours as guests of Oktoberfiesta participate in some brewery games. PHOTOS BY SFBC PHOTO COURTESY OF MUSTANG BREWING Owner Tim Schoelen (L) and Sales Manager Chris Anderson start the unenviable task of cleaning up the OK City Brewing co-op brewhouse the day after the tornado in May 2013. By Bev Blackwood II charities across the Southwest from the taps of the region’s breweries. The ways they ll beer was once accomplish that are often as innovative local beer. Every as the beers they create. community had its own local brewery, supplying beer that reflected the tastes and heritage of the people buying the beer. Being a Writing big part of the community checks isn’t something meant the brewery most craft brewers can do. also gave back to the Thus beer becomes the means they people who supported use to raise funds for their causes. it, a practice craft Eric Marshall, owner of Marshall breweries across Brewing in Tulsa notes, “The ways the Southwest we participate vary from auction have taken to heart. items, to beer festivals, to speaking Their commitment engagements and private parties.” to community The most powerful fundraising giving has meant tools that millions of dollars A thirsty rider on Team Saint Arnold is greeted with a breweries have cold beer at the end of a long day's ride to Austin on in contributions are often their the MS 150. flowing back into PHOTO COURTESY OF SAINT ARNOLD BREWING COMPANY By Chris Whitehead appy Holidays to handcrafted beer lovers one and all. When someone mentions Oklahoma, handcrafted beer is not usually what comes to mind. Recently, this has started to change due to the explosion of the local brewing scene over the last couple of years. The idea of a brewing cooperative for the smaller start-up brewers has grown across the country and Oklahoma is a big part of this trend. A co-op helps solve the problem for start-up brewers with little money to invest in their own equipment and/or facility. A brewing co-op allows the new and upcoming companies to rent the facility to brew their brand specific beers. It is great to see the larger successful breweries providing opportunities for those interested in the art of handcrafted beers. Brewers that See OK Brewers p.5 See Charity p. 3 From the Editor .................................. 2 Event Calendar ....................................4 Homebrew News ..................................6 Directories & Maps .........................12-15 Alpha King Thai'd Up! .................... ...23 Nevada ..........................8 Oklahoma ......................9 Arkansas .......................9 New Mexico ................. 10 S/C/E Texas ................. 16 Austin ......................... 18 N/W Texas ................... 19 Northern Arizona ........20 Southern Arizona ........20 Central Arizona ........... 21 Southern California .....22 San Diego ....................23

Charity Begins With Foam

Bev Blackwood II

All beer was once local beer. Every community had its own local brewery, supplying beer that reflected the tastes and heritage of the people buying the beer. Being a part of the community meant the brewery also gave back to the people who supported it, a practice craft breweries across the Southwest have taken to heart. Their commitment to community giving has meant millions of dollars in contributions flowing back into charities across the Southwest from the taps of the region’s breweries. The ways they accomplish that are often as innovative as the beers they create.

CARING AND SHARING

Writing big checks isn’t something most craft brewers can do. Thus beer becomes the means they use to raise funds for their causes. Eric Marshall, owner of Marshall Brewing in Tulsa notes, “The ways we participate vary from auction items, to beer festivals, to speaking engagements and private parties.” The most powerful fundraising tools that breweries have are often their loyal customers. “Through our MS150 team we have raised over $1 million for the National MS Society,” notes Brock Wagner, the founder of Saint Arnold Brewing Company in Houston. While there’s an investment in time, beer and logistics by Saint Arnold, Wagner remarks, “Our customers are major partners in our ability to make these contributions, sometimes by purchasing tickets to an event, sometimes by purchasing a specific beer.”

Supporting a cause can be as simple as opening a bottle or tap, as numerous breweries contribute a portion of sales for a particular beer to charity. The Galveston Historical Foundation benefits from every pint of Saint Arnold’s Elissa IPA, whose namesake is the tall ship the Foundation maintains. Saint Arnold also raised $100,000 for Operation Homefront through sales of their Homefront IPA. Brewers in and around San Diego produce pink beers whose sales support breast cancer research, while Roughtail Beer in Oklahoma brewed a Bamboo IPA whose sales benefitted the Oklahoma City Zoo.

Local breweries leverage their events to do good for local charities as well. Santa Fe Brewing Company hosts its annual Oktoberfiesta, a beer festival where participants vote for which charities will benefit from the event. “All our customers/fans vote for their top three local charities that should benefit from our fundraiser,” states General Manager Alana Jones. “The same three charities - Santa Fe Humane Society & Animal Shelter, the Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families, and Kitchen Angels - have now won two years in a row.” Stone Brewing in San Diego hosts an Anniversary Festival that raises roughly $200,000 for Boys & Girls Club of San Marcos, Fight ALD, Palomar Family YMCA and the Surfrider Foundation. In San Luis Obispo, Firestone Walker’s Oaktoberfest benefits the Woods Humane Society, a privately funded animal welfare organization.

Some events demand more than a financial contribution, as in the case of Tractor Brewing Company’s blood drive for United Blood Services of New Mexico. Replacing a pint of blood with a pint of beer may not be strictly “doctors orders,” but Nicole Duke says their customers enjoy it. “We hold a friendly competition with other breweries to see who can raise the most pints of blood. Tractor is the proud reigning champion in our area!” Duke boasts.

Ties and Allies

Blood may be thicker than beer, but charitable giving is ultimately about strengthening ties within the community a brewery serves. John Gozigian, Co-founder of Marble Brewery in Albuquerque comments, “Marble Brewery is a part of the New Mexican community, and as a business and as individuals, we benefit from a healthy, diverse, culturally and artistically rich society. The stronger our community, the stronger our business.” Marble’s charitable efforts include the Cervantes' Institute's annual fundraiser in April, Hops and Harvest, an annual fall fundraiser to raise funds for Santa Fe’s Downtown Growers Market, and the Albuquerque Mountain Rescue Council's annual Brewfest.

Port Aransas Brewing Company in Texas gives back to its community through its sponsorship of the Deep Sea Round-up fishing tournament put on by the Port Aransas Boatman Association, which contributes scholarships to every graduating senior from Port Aransas High School. “We promote giving back to the community so that we can build a better port Aransas,” notes founder Bob Petitte. Four Peaks Brewing Company in Tempe, Arizona also supports local schools, teaming up with Wist Office Supplies to contribute $100,000 in supplies to area schoolteachers so they don’t have to pay for them out of their own pockets.

Breweries benefit from their contributions through increased awareness in their community, but there’s more to it than that. Kevin Davis, of Southwest Grape and Grain, a homebrew shop in Albuquerque, New Mexico comments, “We need to be proactive in our community, as these charities [Wounded Warrior Foundation and Children's Hospital of New Mexico] often are assisting our own customers, friends and family members.” His remarks are echoed by John Gozigian of Marble Brewery, “We enjoy supporting our community and seeing them support our brewery. These partnerships are the definition of keeping it local.”

It’s hard to find a brewery that doesn’t contribute back to their community in some way. Whether beer is the gift given to raise awareness, supplied to loosen a donor’s purse strings or simply enjoyed as part of a fundraiser event, charity begins with foam and at home.

While many breweries and their charities are discussed here, we do not have the space to give a shout out to them all. SWBN is sorry for any worthy causes that might not have made this feature. If you don’t know which causes your favorite breweries support, feel free to ask them and also ask how you can help. -Ed

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/Charity+Begins+With+Foam/1581762/187320/article.html.

Oklahoma Brewers Are Resilient

Chris Whitehead

Happy Holidays to handcrafted beer lovers one and all.

When someone mentions Oklahoma, handcrafted beer is not usually what comes to mind. Recently, this has started to change due to the explosion of the local brewing scene over the last couple of years. The idea of a brewing cooperative for the smaller start-up brewers has grown across the country and Oklahoma is a big part of this trend. A co-op helps solve the problem for start-up brewers with little money to invest in their own equipment and/or facility. A brewing co-op allows the new and upcoming companies to rent the facility to brew their brand specific beers. It is great to see the larger successful breweries providing opportunities for those interested in the art of handcrafted beers. Brewers that join their local co-ops typically all have the same goal: one day to build a facility of their own to brew their own recipes.

Mustang Gallops Forward

Oklahoma's handcrafted beer community was hit hard this past May when the OKCity Brewing Cooperative was destroyed by a series of tornadoes, violent winds and heavy rains. Purchased by Mustang Brewing at the end of 2012, this co-op housed Black Mesa Brewing, Redbud Brewing and Anthem Brewing. Tim Schoelen, owner of Mustang Brewing, plans on continuing as a co-op, but right now they are still in the rebuilding stages. (Here is a little teaser for those out there wondering about what happened to Redbud Brewing once Mustang purchased the co-op. Watch for a re-launching next year.) Since Mustang had contracted out and worked with other breweries in the past, it made for an easy transition to flip back to Krebs Brewing in Krebs, Oklahoma and Stevens Point Brewery in Stevens Point, Wisconsin. This has Prevented their production from coming to a standstill. Black Mesa has also had to contract with another brewer to continue its handcrafted beer production.

Schoelen decided to part ways with what was Mustang’s current location (the one destroyed by the tornadoes) and move back to their original headquarters across town. The destruction of the current location has been a Christmas Miracle in disguise. Back in their original location, they will now have twice the brewing space, a full warehouse and full tasting room. They continue to press on while everything is under construction. Mustang has recently brought on gypsy brewer Ethan Buckman as its lead brewer in a new forthcoming Mustang series. He is young, innovative, and comes with a healthy résumé from Church Beer Works and Hofbrauhaus in Pittsburgh. Buckman will be brewing all of Mustang's hop-forward beers from the Unbridled Series. These brews are a little different, above the norm with hops, but not over the top.

Speaking of hops, the local Oklahoma boys that created the early ‘90s hit “Mmmbop” are now celebrating their 21st anniversary as a band, with releasing a beer called Mmmhops. That's right, the Hanson Brothers are all grown up and releasing their pale ale in collaboration with Mustang Brewing. This pale ale pours a light amber color with medium head. This 7.5% ABV beverage is neither bitter nor overly fragrant like one would expect. It is heavier on malts but still rounds out as a well-balanced pale ale. It is now available in the Oklahoma market.

Anthem Goes Solo

Owner Matt Anthony of Anthem Brewing made the decision to move out of the OKCity Brewing family and build a new facility just for Anthem. "Having our own space opens the doors to do all the things I wanted to do from the beginning. Namely, open fermentation, a lot of barrel-aged beers and sours. The open tops and barrels required space and equipment we didn't have before,” Anthony informed. He was also concerned with creating sour ales in the co-op’s shared space. “It would be one thing to unintentionally inoculate one of our own non-sour beers with lacto or pedio, but accidentally inoculating another brewer's beers was a risk I just wasn't willing to take,” he added. Construction on the new brewery is nearly finished. The 15-bbl Newlands system is hooked up, all tanks are in place, and now they are waiting on their state license. Once it’s issued they'll start brewing their barrelaged beers and hopefully start shipping beer before the end of this year or in the first part of January 2014. That extra space also means more tanks, so not only can they brew larger batches, but also multiple beers. Per Anthony, “Having our own place gives us the security of knowing we have the capacity to support brewing new beers." Needless to say, the execution of the exciting expansion plans for the Oklahoma City based breweries has move more quickly than most people probably thought.

During the holiday season, no one likes to see local businesses struggle, especially ones that have been successful. It would have been easy for Mustang, Black Mesa and Anthem to just fold up shop, hang their heads, and walk away. This is not the case at all and it wouldn't be the true "Okie" way. They all kept their heads held high, set new goals, and are now on their way to becoming bigger and stronger. Look for big things to come from OKCity Brewing Cooperative in the near future.

This holiday season, put down grandma's eggnog and pick up a handcrafted beer of your choice.

This is not our usual brewery profile, but these Oklahoma breweries are not usual. When this feature was planned, all were up and running and successful in a cooperative space. Now, despite destruction and disruption of that space, they are already or soon will be operating again. SWBN wanted to convey their can-do spirit in our this holiday issue and wish them the best. -Ed.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/Oklahoma+Brewers+Are+Resilient/1581766/187320/article.html.

Next Page


Publication List
Using a screen reader? Click Here