Southwest Brewing News June/July 2015 : Page 1

June / July • 2015 Volume 23 / Number 3 By Damion Terrell ILLUSTRATIONS BY HANS GRANHEIM Ted Rice, president and brewmaster of Marble Brewery. PHOTO COURTESY OF MARBLE BREWERY. By Bev Blackwood II T he age-old proverb, “birds of a feather, flock together” takes on a new meaning when it comes to the current surge of craft ft brewery openings; where there’s one craft brewery, you will often find several. “We have to locate in LI or MI [zoning districts],” informed Austin Beerworks Co-founder Mike McGovern, n, discussing why they chose to o locate in North Austin. “On a much lower level was the fact that this area has older industrial space, which often has a lower rental rate. This area also has a great road network, which helps on the self-distribution front.” Those three factors have helped create a cluster of three craft breweries: Austin Beerworks, Adelbert’s Brewery, and Circle Brewing Bre within roughly a mile m of each other. Being close together has some advantages, noted Sarah Zomper Haney, general manager of Adelbert’s Brewery, “For the most part, we all have very similar hours. That helps drive business to all of o us since if someone is making the drive to one, on they are likely to drive to another.” The addition of 4th Tap See Neighbor p. 3 t was named after the street where it all began. It started with w brewing rock solid beer. And seven b years later, it's all about making y the beer shine even brighter. th M Marble Brewery in Albuquerque, New Mexico is exceeding all N expectations on all fronts. In the e f fall of 2014, Marble was named Small Brewing Company and S S Small Brewing Company Brewer of the Year at the Great American o Beer Festival in Denver, Colorado. B Brewmaster and President of Operations Ted Rice shared, "I’ve had my eye on the prize for sometime now. I really worked to win this year.” At the GABF in 2012, Marble’s Imperial Red won silver and Double White won bronze. Rice continued, “So I worked and tweaked the recipes to win two golds for 2014.” His hard work was rewarded in more ways than one. Marble also took gold in the Kellerbier category at the World Beer Cup for their Pilsner . The traditional pilsner is usually dominated by the German breweries. Rice See Marble p. 4 Event Calendar ......................... 2 From the Editor ........................ 3 Homebrew Beer Stylist .............. 6 Directories & Maps .............. 12-15 New Mexico ..................8 Oklahoma ....................9 Nevada ...................... 10 Arkansas .....................11 S/C/E Texas ................ 16 Austin ........................ 17 N/W Texas ................... 18 Central Arizona ........... 21 Northern Arizona ........ 22 Southern Arizona ........ 22 Southern California .....22 San Diego ....................23

Won

Bev Blackwood II

The age-old proverb, “birds of a feather, flock together” takes on a new meaning when it comes to the current surge of craft brewery openings; where there’s one craft brewery, you will often find several. “We have to locate in LI or MI [zoning districts],” informed Austin Beerworks Co-founder Mike McGovern, discussing why they chose to locate in North Austin. “On a much lower level was the fact that this area has older industrial space, which often has a lower rental rate. This area also has a great road network, which helps on the self-distribution front.”

Those three factors have helped create a cluster of three craft breweries: Austin Beerworks, Adelbert’s Brewery, and Circle Brewing within roughly a mile of each other. Being close together has some advantages, noted Sarah Zomper Haney, general manager of Adelbert’s Brewery, “For the most part, we all have very similar hours. That helps drive business to all of us since if someone is making the drive to one, they are likely to drive to another.” The addition of 4th Tap Brewing Co-operative to the neighborhood will further enhance the neighborhood’s reputation as a brewery destination. North By Northwest, a nearby brewpub that predated all the microbreweries, enjoys having some company on the north side of Austin. “I occasionally hear about north side brewery crawls or bike cruises,” stated North By Northwest Head Brewer Kevin Roark, “I'd like to see it become more of a tourist draw.”

A similarly industrial neighborhood of Albuquerque, New Mexico has actually been given the designation of “The Brewing District” in 2014 by their State Senate. Home to Il Vicino, La Cumbre and Nexus breweries, the designation came about via a chance meeting between then State Senator Tim Keller and La Cumbre’s President, Jeff Erway. “Tim Keller stopped by my booth and introduced himself,” Erway recalled. After discovering that Keller had been instrumental in re-branding an area of Albuquerque formerly known as “The War Zone” to “The International District,” Erway saw an opportunity. “I mentioned that several times in the media, this area of town had been referred to as “The Brewery District.” He [Keller] thought it was a great idea.” The breweries within the district have always worked cooperatively, but the designation has helped to cement their relationship. Since then, Red Door Brewing has become the fourth brewery in the district. “I think in the future you’ll see brewery district tours, which are hopon hop-off and help move people around between the establishments,” remarked Red Door CEO Matt Biggs.

Why Visit Just One?

It often takes one determined brewery to open the way for others, as Peticolas Brewing did for Dallas’ Design District, located just north of downtown on the edge of the Trinity River. “Dallas did not have a brewery when I started planning Peticolas Brewing Company,” stated founder Michael Peticolas. “Although brewing was not previously allowed in the Design District, I filed an amendment to the Dallas City Property Code seeking to allow the manufacture of alcohol.” Once that amendment had cleared all the regulatory hurdles, not only did his brewery open, but Community Brewing Company, Texas Ale Project and Four Corners Brewing have opened nearby. A fifth, Noble Rey Brewing, expects to open soon and founder Chris Rigoulot observed, “We are already being contacted from people outside of the city and state that see how close we are to Peticolas and Community and are setting up their brew-cations.”

Bridging the Arkansas River is the informally named “Central Arkansas Hop District” comprised of Diamond Bear Brewery, Lost Forty Brewing, Stone's Throw, Blue Canoe, Vino's Brewpub and Damgoode Pies Pizza & Brewpub. The fledgling brewing district will add Rebel Kettle Brewing and Flyway Brewing in the near future and eventually Leap of Faith, a brewery in the planning stages. It isn’t the only district forming, as downtown Tucson, Arizona has Barrio Brewing, Pueblo Vida and Borderlands brewing within a mile of downtown with more breweries in the planning stages. Henderson, Nevada has gone a step further and created a “Booze District” that features three breweries, a craft distillery and a winery. Craft Haus Brewery, Vegas Brewing and Bad Beat Brewing hold down the beer end of the district, which is all housed in a series of nondescript warehouses along Eastgate Road.

Of course, San Diego, California is pretty much one big “district” with several aggregations of breweries and fine beer bars throughout the region. Mike Sardina, vice president of the San Diego Craft Brewers Guild and assistant executive officer at Societe Brewing commented, “Our brewery is located in what you might call the Kearny Mesa ‘district’ or ‘neighborhood.’ We (Societe) are located within walking distance of several other San Diego beer establishments, including Helm's Brewing Company, Quantum Brewing Company, Council Brewing Company, and Kilowatt Brewing, as well as one of the most historic pubs in the county, O'Brien's Pub, and the newly opened gastropub, Common Theory.” Sardina added, “You can easily walk to all these locations within the course of an afternoon.”

As with any business, craft brewing requires a certain combination of location, accommodation and costs to sustain a viable enterprise. Given that, it shouldn’t be any surprise that many successful breweries soon have neighbors. Economics aside, craft brewing has long been more cooperative than competitive, so having breweries as neighbors can also be extremely useful for all concerned. Any brewing district, whether defined by zoning, declaration, association or geographic proximity, is a sure sign of a vibrant brewing community. As beer tourism grows, look for beer lovers to flock to the abundance of craft beer choices brewing districts provide.

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/Won/2027801/261455/article.html.

The Metamorphosis Of MARBLE

Damion Terrell

It was named after the street where it all began. It started with brewing rock solid beer. And seven years later, it's all about making the beer shine even brighter. Marble Brewery in Albuquerque, New Mexico is exceeding all expectations on all fronts. In the fall of 2014, Marble was named Small Brewing Company and Small Brewing Company Brewer of the Year at the Great American Beer Festival in Denver, Colorado Brewmaster and President of Operations Ted Rice shared, "I’ve had my eye on the prize for sometime now. I really worked to win this year.” At the GABF in 2012, Marble’s Imperial Red won silver and Double White won bronze. Rice continued, “So I worked and tweaked the recipes to win two golds for 2014.” His hard work was rewarded in more ways than one.

Marble also took gold in the Kellerbier category at the World Beer Cup for their Pilsner. The traditional pilsner is usually dominated by the German breweries. Rice Smiled, “It was fun watching them announce the winner: third was a German brewery, second an Italian, and then first place, some small brewery from Albuquerque.”

Other big news for Marble is their new design and image launch. The original logo, based on the brewery’s location on the corner of Marble and 1st, was hops encased in different colored marbles. The design was misunderstood and dubbed by patrons as “circles and roses.” Rice explained, “The old design was good, but we grew beyond it and it was time for a new look. The brewery evolved and matured, and we needed a new look that represented what we’ve become.” Rice and the Marble staff held a design workshop to dive into what they felt represented the brewery. The big take away was that everyone felt a tie to the city of Albuquerque and to the Southwest. Working with a professional designer, Marble’s new logo of a bird holding a jewel, affectionately named by the staff as “Maverick,” and new packaging that truly captures Albuquerque and the surrounding area was created.

A Solid Team

The staff is a big part of growing Marble into what it is today. Josh Trujillo, as head brewer, is in charge of day-today operations of the brewery. Trujillo is passionate about taste, texture and quality of the product Marble produces. A pleasure to talk with and knowledgeable of his craft, when Trujillo gets a chance to unwind, he is still diving into those passions. From Gardening to cooking, from the ground to the plate and glass, Trujillo knows the art and science behind what tastes great. Anna Kornke, the brewess, is Marble’s lab tech, quality control and even parttime brewer.As lab tech and quality control, Kornke tracks yeast count, fermentation gravity readings, CO2 and oxygen levels from the canning line and serving bright tanks and more, to ensure quality and consistency comes out of the Marble taps. Nate Jackson is the packaging manager in charge of getting those newly designed containers filled with the beer Marble fans love. Constantly tinkering and fixing, Jackson keeps Marble’s bottling and canning line in check. Aaron Moore, sales director, oversees accounts from Arizona, Colorado and New Mexico.Moore processes requests, bringing back distribution needs to the brewery for processing. The Marble brewers including Andrew Krosche and Dan Grissom work to keep the Marble kettles brewing constantly and consistently to meet the demands of Marble fans. Amber Rice, director of marketing, coordinates Marble’s events and promotions.And Barbie Gonzalez, director of taproom operations, with the taproom staff of Marble’s three locations, keeps the Marble experience enjoyable and consistent for craft beer aficionados and novices alike. This team is what has grown the Marble fan base and experience from its humble beginnings to their extraordinary standings and wins in just under seven years.

For Marble, it doesn’t stop there. In the past year, Marble has invested heavily in their taprooms. At the main brewery taproom, major renovations include patio area with a shade structure and outside bar.The pub room area has additional seating area, new farm tables, standing height tables, bar and restrooms. Marble used the same contractor for the westside taproom doubling its seating area while giving it the same look and feel. Rice described both taprooms as “a breath of fresh air, and reception by the customers has been extremely enthusiastic.” In May, Marble opened the new Santa Fe Taproom on Cerrillos Rd. near the Railyard shopping area.

Always Evolving

For 2015, starting in May, Marble broke ground at their main location to expand brewery operations to add 7,000 more square feet, doubling the current size. Plans include increasing ceiling height for new 15-barrel fermenters that stand around 23 feet heigh. These will replace the 120-barrel fermenters that currently reside outside. Rice commented, “It is a ton of work to harvest yeast, empty and clean outside. I’ll be happy to get the fermenters inside.” The new predicted capacity should allow Marble to produce up to 30,000 barrels a year. “We can give our loyal passionate fans the beer they love and allow Us to flourish,” Rice added. Given this new production ability, there will be many new special brewing projects in the works for Marble’s future. Rice wants to continue to enhance Marble’s special offerings, including the Double IPA, bottling the Imperial Red, releasing a new brew called Stout Americano and canning the Double White. When asked for his next plan for the GABF, Rice responded, “If we can get into the GABF, I want to enter the Brett IPA because it is a true example of American ingenuity.” Brett IPA, released in April, was a new IPA, fresh hopped after aging for six months in oak barrels inoculated with special brettanomyces yeast. Rice is also planning a special collaboration brew with Sun King Brewery in Indianapolis, Indiana. In closing, Rice stated, “No more circle and roses. It’s Maverick from here on out!”

Read the full article at http://mydigitalpublication.com/article/The+Metamorphosis+Of+MARBLE/2028000/261455/article.html.

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