Southwest Brewing News Dec. 2009/Jan. 2010 : Page 1

By Darren Morrissey F T he City of Newport Beach offers many things for many people: pristine beaches, sunshine, surf, sailing, and, since April 1, 1995, quality craft beer. Newport Beach Brewing Company is located on the Balboa Peninsula in the historic Cannery Village area of Newport Beach, Calif., and housed in what used to be Delaney’s Seafood Market. The building has a distinct fishing/ seaside charm. The location is a welcome respite after a day at the beach, or as an INSIDE Calendar of Events ............................2 Mountain Sun Wins Alpha King ...........3 Want to Play a Beer Game? ...............6 Queen of Quaff ............................. 7 Best of Show: Old and Cold ...............8 Crafty Brewers: Joey Villareal ...........10 The Healthy Pint .............................15 anchor destination to be followed by a walk along the beach, on the pier, or around the bay. Sports fans will be happy to see the ample amount of televisions for watching their favorite sporting events both inside and on the spacious outdoor patio. Welcoming All From the beginning, founding owner Michael Madlock has strived to provide an atmosphere conducive to the enjoyment See Newport Beach p. 4 State by State News Kansas...12 North/Central N. Mexico...13 S. New Mexico/SW Texas...14 Louisiana.......20 N.Texas...21 S/Central Texas....22 Austin....23 Oklahoma....24 Arkansas...25 Central Arizona....26 S. & N. Arizona...27 Nevada ....28 S. California...29 San Diego...30 Top to Bottom- BEER NOIR. Brock Wagner, founder of St.Arnold Brewing Co., Houston, Texas, circa 1985. PHOTO: ANNA LITTLE Eric Marshall (L) and Adam Marshall at Oktoberfest in 2005 at the end of Eric’s apprenticeship in Germany. PHOTO: ERIC MARSHALL Current day Dan Norton at River City Brewing. PHOTO: DAN NORTON Teenager Dan Norton with beercat. PHOTO: DAN NORTON or most of us, the holidays bring us home. We might travel back to our hometowns to visit family and friends or we might simply take a mental journey back to Christmas mornings, local sports and home-cooked favorites. Can the memories and experiences of home affect the beer we drink in the Southwest? Rings a Bell Dan Norton, head brewer at River City Brewing Company in Wichita, Kan., would definitely agree that home influences his brewing. A passionate Michigan native who has been brewing the last nine years in Kansas, Norton feels most affected in his brewing by the beers from a home state brewery. Norton learned about beer in his youth by sampling the “entire portfolio” from Bell’s Brewery out of Kalamazoo. Norton and his friends from grade school, known as the Brew Crew, shared in the education of good beers brewed by Bell’s. “Basically every activity we did revolved around beer,” says Norton, including See Home p. 5

Where The Beer Meets The Beach...

David Mulvihill

The City of Newport Beach offers many things for many people: pristine beaches, sunshine, surf, sailing, and, since April 1, 1995, quality craft beer. Newport Beach Brewing Company is located on the Balboa Peninsula in the historic Cannery Village area of Newport Beach, Calif., and housed in what used to be Delaney’s Seafood Market. The building has a distinct fishing/ seaside charm. The location is a welcome respite after a day at the beach, or as an anchor destination to be followed by a walk along the beach, on the pier, or around the bay.

Sports fans will be happy to see the ample amount of televisions for watching their favorite sporting events both inside and on the spacious outdoor patio.

Welcoming All From the beginning, founding owner Michael Madlock has strived to provide an atmosphere conducive to the enjoyment Of quality food and drink by families, as well as younger and older patrons from all walks of life. He and his partners also desired to provide a devoted brewer with a varied palette of ingredients and the flexibility to create and design signature brews that would build a following. This quickly becomes apparent when witnessing not only the wide variety of NBBC’s beers, but also in the food selections provided by Chef Abel Zaragosa’s culinary team, and the attention General Manager Luc Andre gives in directing his staff, overseeing operations, and assuring customers have an enjoyable experience.

In addition to pub grub, including brick oven pizzas, burgers and sandwiches, Chef Abel’s menu offers a selection of salads, pastas, South of the Border items, baby back ribs, and even a kids’ menu to keep your young ones happy. There are usually daily specials on the blackboard, some with your first pint included in the price. Specials are definitely worth trying, as they often allow the chef to flex his culinary muscles for things like Crispy Sage and Brown Butter Pasta, or Spinach and Capers Halibut. Soft drinks, a full bar (including martini menu), and wine are available to those seeking alternate libation.

Brewing it All Award-winning brewer Kirk Roberts has been brewing at NBBC since 1997.

Although not usually constrained by style guidelines, Roberts has managed to win a sizeable number of GABF medals over the years. He prefers to brew a wide variety of beers - a tasty assortment with a selection approachable to contrasting palates, and always something new and exciting on the forefront.

There are typically five to seven Newport brews available, along with a similar number of upscale guest beers. According to Roberts, “Being by the beach, we do have our blond and some other lighter styles, but I try to mix it up. I try to do some interesting beers.” The 15,000-lb.

Grain silo (next to the rear parking lot entrance) typically supplies enough grain for two-three months of brewing on the 14- barrel system housed in close quarters behind the bar. The mash tun and hot liquor tanks are behind the auxiliary bar, with four 14- barrel fermenters directly behind the main bar. The cold storage box contains five 14-barrel Brite tanks and a Grundy. “It’s a challenge with the way we are set up. I’ve seen less and less new breweries set up like this and there is a reason for it…It’s cool to have all the tanks out front but it’s a challenge,” remarked Roberts. The tight setup requires early brew and transfer days in order to be out of the way of the bartenders come opening time. Another minor challenge with the system is that the hot liquor tank is hard piped to the mash tun.

It doesn’t have a manifold, which restricts brewing flexibility. Systems with manifolds and pumps allow pumping the brew through hoses back into the mash tun, so it can be used as a hop-back to do things like fresh hop beers.

How does he decide what beers to brew? “I’m pretty organic; something will come to me, and I’ll decide, I’m going to try that. I have ones I keep coming back to [prior successes]. Some brewers have a schedule set on their seasonals…I just like to be able to be more flexible,” he shared.

Roberts likes to mix it up with his seasonals, specialty beers, and even some of the regulars. He tries variations of weizens and lighter beers during the summer, usually an oktoberfest style during that season, and something big during the winter months.

But don’t be surprised to see heavier beers available even in the warmer months

- brews like a barrel-aged imperial porter running on nitrogen, or Antidote, a blend Newport Beach continued from p.1 I try to do some interesting beers. - Kirk Roberts, NBBC of Riptide Red aged in a bourbon barrel mixed 50/50 with the citrusy Village Idiot IPA. Roberts brought Antidote to the Orange County Beer Festival this summer and ran it through a hop infuser (a “Randall” of sorts) with Columbus Hops; it morphed into an Extreme Antidote.

The only real regular of the regular standard beers is the Newport Beach Blonde, which is available most of the time due to its popularity with the beach crowd.

Bisbees ESB or another ESB is often on instead of a red, and a variation of Pelican Pale is often available. This past summer Roberts brewed a bitter instead of the ESB and later decided to try an imperial ESB for his ESB fans. He even brewed a wheat lager.

Throughout the year, Roberts teams up with Derek Bougie to present “beer socials.” The NBBC staff assists them with these informal events that highlight beer from various varietal segments (i.e. hoppy beers, session ales, etc.) and feature food pairings by Chef Zaragosa. The team also schedules larger festival events during the year, such as the recent OctoBEERfest, and last winter’s Winterfest.

So, regardless of the season, be sure to make Newport Beach Brewing Company your destination for quality craft beer, food and entertainment. It’s one of the many charming attractions the City of Newport Beach has to offer.

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Where+The+Beer+Meets+The+Beach.../287449/28768/article.html.

"Home Brewing"

Darren Morrissey

For most of us, the holidays bring us home. We might travel back to our hometowns to visit family and friends or we might simply take a mental journey back to Christmas mornings, local sports and home-cooked favorites. Can the memories and experiences of home affect the beer we drink in the Southwest?

Rings a Bell Dan Norton, head brewer at River City Brewing Company in Wichita, Kan., would definitely agree that home influences his brewing. A passionate Michigan native who has been brewing the last nine years in Kansas, Norton feels most affected in his brewing by the beers from a home state brewery. Norton learned about beer in his youth by sampling the “entire portfolio” from Bell’s Brewery out of Kalamazoo.

Norton and his friends from grade school, known as the Brew Crew, shared in the education of good beers brewed by Bell’s.

“Basically every activity we did revolved around beer,” says Norton, including Everything from holiday parties to tailgating at University of Michigan football games. Some of his favorite memories involve “…the many Two Hearted Ales that I have enjoyed lakeside by the campfire at my aunt and uncle’s campground.” Wheat is OK Being a lifelong resident of Tulsa has provided extra insight to Eric Marshall, owner, president of, and brewer at Marshall Brewing Company, as he started up his brewery. He says, “To run a business you have to be able to sell your product and have appeal to your local beer drinkers.” This is born out by the popularity of his flagship Sundown Wheat, which Marshall knew would appeal to Oklahoma customers because, “This part of the world loves wheat beer.” Further influencing Marshall’s brewing was the time spent in Germany where he apprenticed in many breweries and was awarded the International Diploma in Brewing Technology from the World Brewing Academy.

Marshall says these experiences kindled his love of German beers and discloses, “I think I brew the Old Pavilion Pilsner more for myself than anyone else.” Styled for Texas Home has also been an inspiration to Brock Wagner, the founder of Saint Arnold Brewing Company in Houston, Texas, but in a different way. He credits growing up in Cincinnati, Ohio and Brussels, Belgium with their great brewing histories as forming and affecting his interest in beer as well as exposing him to many beer styles. This curiosity led him to take up homebrewing while studying at Rice University. Wagner says neither of the cities where he lived growing up has affected the beers currently brewed at Saint Arnold, however. “I grew up drinking Little Kings Cream Ale and we don’t do a cream ale,” he says, while also noting that they also don’t brew any Belgian-style beers either. Wagner did use his homebrewing recipes from college and a desire to appeal to the local tastes of his new home in Texas when developing the lineup for Saint Arnold, including their most popular brew, the Saint Arnold Fancy Lawnmower Beer, a German-style kölsch.

Remem-beer-ing All of the brewers spoke of beer providing not only inspiration for their current vocation, but a number of great memories while growing up. Brock Wagner recalls playing tennis with his father as a teenager.

Each match would end with the two of them splitting a Christian Moerlein beer. Wagner notes that while his young palate was not sophisticated, he can still remember it being “a great, malty lager.” Dan Norton’s best memories of his youth are a mixture of the Brew Crew and Bell’s beers. These experiences culminated years later when Norton returned home for his 10-year high school reunion. Before his trip, he e-mailed the Bell’s Brewery and “…had the absolute privilege of sitting down with Larry Bell himself at the Eccentric Café in Kalamazoo.” It was quite an honor to meet the creator of the beers of his youth and he found Larry Bell to be a “super nice guy.” Eric Marshall also got to mix together home and beer while working at Victory Brewing Company in Pennsylvania.

His alma mater University of Tulsa was playing a football game against Navy in Annapolis. Marshall made the short drive to the game to tailgate with the Tulsa fans along with some Victory Golden Monkey he brought from the brewery. Marshall was able to visit with friends from home and celebrate a double overtime victory by Tulsa.

“Present” Day Brewing All of the brewers were asked for examples of how their beers today reflect their influences and, just for fun, their most memorable Christmas present. Eric Marshall, who as a child was a huge G.I. Joe fan, says it’s his experience with the Oklahoma market that most affects his brewing. He feels, “Oklahoma is a fun market because a lot of people are transitioning to drinking craft beer,” and he is happy to be leading them on their journey with his Sundown Wheat and the Atlas IPA. Atlas is an IPA that focuses more on balance than being overly hoppy. He plans to draw on his experiences in Germany and the East Coast as the market grows and matures.

Dan Norton, who always enjoyed the annual $100 bill from his doting grandparents, takes credit for bringing an IPA to River City Brewing. When he started at River City, he lobbied to replace Razzberry Wheat with Tornado Alley IPA, his homage to Bell’s Two Hearted Ale. It’s been five years since the switch and the Tornado Alley IPA is their second best-selling beer.

Brock Wagner, who counts a bike, a Lite-Brite, and a Sizzlers racetrack among his favorite pre-brewing toys, remembers his family bringing out special bottles of wine during the holidays. This inspired him to make the Saint Arnold Christmas Ale that Wagner describes as “hugely popular” and he added, “…seems to make people do very silly things and then feel compelled to tell us about them.” Wagner says when Saint Arnold first opened, he didn’t think the market was ready for Belgian-style beers and didn’t have the capacity for them, but their brewery expansion and changing Texas tastes mean the time may be right for Wagner to bring his experiences in Brussels to making Belgian-style beers at Saint Arnold.

No Taste Like Home Eric Marshall sums it up best by stating, “I always say that designing a beer is not just mixing up some ingredients, but also should be influenced by something.” As you drink your holiday cheer from your favorite brewery this season, remember that in addition to the malt, water, and yeast, you are tasting some of the brewer’s experiences of home, family and friends.

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/%26quot%3BHome+Brewing%26quot%3B/287451/28768/article.html.

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