Southwest Brewing News February/March 2016 : Page 1

February/March • 2016 Volume 24/Number 1 By Bev Blackwood II hen you think about craft beer, the first thing you think of usually isn’t how many jobs were created by the pint in front of you. Indeed, the only time money enters your thoughts is when it’s time to pay the tab, right? Yet craft beer is an economy, one that extends from the brewery, to the distributor and into the bar where you enjoy it. From your barstool, you can see the economic impact. The server is earning a wage, the bar is paying rent or a mortgage and bought the beer from a distributor. The distributor bought trucks, paid drivers and bought the beer from the brewery. The brewery has to pay brewers, buy the ingre-dients and purchase equipment for brewing and packaging. Building out a brewery (and a multi-tap bar) requires specific skills: plumbing, electrical and welding to name a few, and as breweries grow they often need quality control manag-ers, marketing and sales teams, accountants and other fields of expertise. In addition, excise tax, sales tax, income tax, property tax, licensing fees, permit fees, em-ployee benefits and utilities are paid out by every single entity as well. A brewpub, while more self-contained, still has to buy equipment and ingredients, has serv-ers, cooks, dishwashers and San Diego graphic artist Rudy Pollorena Jr. created all that food comes from a a new business in beer-related merchandise after he distributor, so there’s a supply chain created this poster featuring a matrix of San Diego’s there as well. Given all that, the craft breweries. Graphic courtesy of craftbeerd.com. See Economy p. 3 (L to R) Staff members Kytana Chavez, Brooke Cunningham and Jenny Otto welcome PHOTO BY ERIK ADAMS you to SanTan. here is a lot to like about Chandler icon SanTan Brew-ing Company. After all, what started as a simple brewpub in the Phoenix suburb’s main square in 2007 has grown to become the second largest brewery in the state of Arizona. Their Southwestern-style ales can be found almost everywhere in Arizona, as well as in Texas, New Mexico and Southern California. This impressive growth is due to many things, but fans may note SanTan’s passion for beer and food pairing, their popular season-als, and certainly their dedication to canning, as three important reasons. Yes They Can SanTan began canning in 2010, and has been a major proponent of it ever since. Head brewer Gabe Wilson identified several reasons for why they started can-See SanTan p . 4 From the Editor ........................ 2 Homebrew Beer Stylist .............. 6 Event Calendar ......................... 2 Directories & Maps .............. 12-15 Oklahoma ......................8 Southern California .......8 San Diego ......................9 New Mexico ................. 10 Nevada ........................ 16 Arkansas ..................... 17 S/C/E Texas ................. 18 Austin ......................... 19 N/W Texas ...................20 Northern Arizona ........ 22 Central Arizona ...........23 Southern Arizona ........ 23 By Erik Adams

Craft Beer Ripples Through The Economy

Bev Blackwood II

When you think about craft beer, the first thing you think of usually isn’t how many jobs were created by the pint in front of you. Indeed, the only time money enters your thoughts is when it’s time to pay the tab, right? Yet craft beer is an economy, one that extends from the brewery, to the distributor and into the bar where you enjoy it. From your barstool, you can see the economic impact. The server is earning a wage, the bar is paying rent or a mortgage and bought the beer from a distributor. The distributor bought trucks, paid drivers and bought the beer from the brewery. The brewery has to pay brewers, buy the ingredients and purchase equipment for brewing and packaging. Building out a brewery (and a multi-tap bar) requires specific skills: plumbing, electrical and welding to name a few, and as breweries grow they often need quality control managers, marketing and sales teams, accountants and other fields of expertise. In addition, excise tax, sales tax, income tax, property tax, licensing fees, permit fees, employee benefits and utilities are paid out by every single entity as well. A brewpub, while more self-contained, still has to buy equipment and ingredients, has servers, cooks, dishwashers and all that food comes from a distributor, so there’s a supply chain there as well. Given all that, the craft beer on the bar in front of you really is a bargain!

Making an Impact

The Brewers Association calculates that in the Southwest Brewing News’ region, breweries and brewpubs create just over $9 billion of economic impact, which is roughly 16% of the national total for craft beer. Craft beer has become a big business and it’s been growing at almost 20% annually. That translates to roughly two breweries or brewpubs opening per day nationally, and in December of 2015, the total number of U.S. breweries exceeded the previous high of 4,131 from 1873. The majority of these new breweries are local and as a result, 75% of drinking-age adults live within 10 miles of a brewery.

There are other economic effects of the “drink local” phenomenon, as the notion of “beer tourism” has come to be a new category of business. San Diego Beer Week attracted over 20,000 visitors to its events and the economic contributions of those visitors exceeded that of visitors to San Diego’s famed Comic Con. They hosted beer geeks from as far away as Brazil and Great Britain during the week’s festivities. Given that San Diego County accounts for a full quarter of the craft breweries in the state of California, that shouldn’t be too surprising. “Stone Brewing is the third largest tourist draw in San Diego County,” notes Mike Sardina, who works at Societe Brewing Company and is the incoming president of the San Diego Brewers Guild. Sardina lists off a whole range of beer businesses that have cropped up in recent years. “There’s a handful of companies that take people around and are not only just shuttling people from place to place who don’t want to drive, but are also bringing an educational component to that.” In addition, for breweries that don’t offer a dining option like Societe, “We host food trucks pretty much five days a week,” Sardina states. This enables patrons to not only slow down their drinking but also explore new cuisines. “It’s really kind of a great relationship we have.”

Beer tourism isn’t the only business that’s sprung up recently. Rudy Pollorena blended his passion for San Diego beer and graphic design into Craft Beer, which started in 2013 with a poster listing all of San Diego’s craft breweries. [See cover.] His original San Diego centric designs are now branching out to the rest of the state and beyond. The area’s penchant for hops hasn’t gone unnoticed either, as Sardina points out, “In East County San Diego, we’ve seen a number of local hop farms open up within the past couple of years.” Given the long lead-time to get good yields on a crop, there’s clearly confidence that craft beer is here to stay

Every One Matters

The 116 breweries of San Diego County are a boon to the economy, but even one brewery can have an impact as noted by Paul Barwick, special projects director for the little town of Boerne, Texas, population 12,384. “The Dodging Duck Brewhaus is one of those established ‘independent anchors' in the heart of Boerne. From the city’s perspective, I firmly believe there is a definite positive economic impact with regard to increased revenues that the Duck has steadily developed and continues to foster as an early and constantly vibrant commercial enterprise in the River Road District,” he comments. Indeed another small town in Texas, Shiner, is famous simply because there’s a brewery there. The Spoetzl Brewery is Shiner’s major business and in a town of just over 2,000 residents, it doesn’t take much to be number one. With nearly all of their employees living within 10 miles of the brewery, its contributions both financially and socially to the community are substantial.

With the advent of e-commerce, every brewery has the opportunity to sell their branded merchandise anywhere in the country and some, like The Bruery in Placentia, Calif. Have created their own beer clubs (in their case, the Reserve Society and Preservation Society), which give access to special release beers via a subscription model as well as discounts on merchandise.

The ABGB in Austin, Texas has capitalized on the abundance of local music in their community by incorporating a stage into their brewpub design and rather than expecting local bands to play for name recognition, pay bands to play, improving not only the caliber of music performed but providing essential support to struggling artists working their way into the industry.

So the next time you’re at your local brewery or using the Southwest Brewing News to do a bit of beer touring elsewhere (Thanks!) Consider how the beer you’re enjoying isn’t just good to drink, it’s good for the economy.

San Diego graphic artist Rudy Pollorena Jr. Created a new business in beer-related merchandise after he created this poster featuring a matrix of San Diego’s craft breweries. Graphic courtesy of craftbeerd.com.

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Craft+Beer+Ripples+Through+The+Economy/2392221/289968/article.html.

It's Easy To Be A Santan Fan

Erik Adams

There is a lot to like about Chandler icon SanTan Brewing Company. After all, what started as a simple brewpub in the Phoenix suburb’s main square in 2007 has grown to become the second largest brewery in the state of Arizona. Their Southwestern-style ales can be found almost everywhere in Arizona, as well as in Texas, New Mexico and Southern California. This impressive growth is due to many things, but fans may note SanTan’s passion for beer and food pairing, their popular seasonals, and certainly their dedication to canning, as three important reasons.

Yes They Can

SanTan began canning in 2010, and has been a major proponent of it ever since. Head brewer Gabe Wilson identified several reasons for why they started canning, “For one, nobody else in Arizona was doing it. Secondly, canning fits well with the Arizona outdoor lifestyle. Thirdly, it is an effective way of getting the freshest beer to our customers.”

When SanTan started canning, their line would fill about 25 cans a minute. Now, they can fill approximately 10 times that in the same amount of time. One look at the size of their production brewery, which became operational in 2013, and you can see that SanTan has enjoyed immense growth. Canning has played an integral part in this growth. They now can the year-round offerings Devil’s Ale, Hopshock IPA, Mr. Pineapple, Hefeweizen, Sunspot Gold and Moonjuice Galactic IPA.

Not only do they can a lot of craft beer, SanTan is also a strong advocate of other breweries doing the same. “We are so excited to see more breweries canning,” Wilson noted. “We think that it is a better packaging method, and it means a more diverse canned craft beer selection is available to customers.” One indicator of this passion is Ameri- CAN, the Southwest’s premier canned craft beer festival.

SanTan has hosted Ameri-CAN since 2011. The party goes down at Scottsdale Civic Center each May. “We host Ameri- CAN in order to improve the overall perception of canned craft beer,” Wilson informed. The stellar selection of beers, many of which are not available in Arizona, make this a highly anticipated event for craft beer enthusiasts statewide. Think Cigar City, Six Point, Revolution, Sun King and numerous others. It also consists of a certified beer judging segment as well. “The judging encourages other breweries to participate. This is not just another beer festival,” Wilson added.

SanTan Seasonals

Brewmaster Anthony Canecchia, head brewer Gabe Wilson, and the brewing team of Josh Telich, Stephen Henderson, Chase Saraiva, Jesse Kortepeter and Nick Pauley brew a respected portfolio of beers. Their best seller, the highly rated pale ale Devil’s San Tan continued from cover Ale, is not to be ignored. A former seasonal, Mr. Pineapple pineapple wheat ale, became so popular they had no choice but to brew it year-round. However, a key component to SanTan’s popularity continues to be its seasonal selections.

From February to April, SanTan offers Grapefruit Shandy (4.25% ABV), a session ale brewed with locally sourced grapefruit. That is followed by Lime Leaf (4.9% ABV) from May to July, which is a traditionally brewed cream ale jazzed up with kaffir lime leaves. SanTan pours Oktoberfest (5.5% ABV), a German-style lager with a toasty caramel malt profile made for autumn enjoyment, from August through November. They finish out the year with Sex Panther (6.9% ABV), a double chocolate porter brewed with Colonial Rosewood cocoa, chocolate malt, white wheat and lots of love. It is available November through January.

Although not technically seasonals, the From the Vault series is also a rotating selection of draft-only beers. Given that the San- Tan brewpub had previously been a bank, they named the series after the vault door they still use for a manager office. “They are a limited quantity of high gravity beers that we brew each year. When the batch runs out, it’s gone until next year,” Wilson reported.

Vault beers include Kilohop Ludicrous IPA (9.8% ABV), Winter Warmer (9.5% ABV) and Count Hopula blood red IPA (9% ABV). Wilson acknowledged that the Winter Warmer might very well be their most popular non-flagship brew right now. “The whole idea of the Vault series was to offer special beers deserving of sipping,” Wilson noted.

Pairing is Sharing

A third indicator of SanTan’s popularity is their love of pairing their beers with food. The brewpub, known for its delicious Southwestern gastropub-style fare, makes for the perfect playground for their brewers and chefs to collaborate on how a specific beer style might complement a food dish and vice versa.

The brewpub serves burger patties ground on the premises and house-smoked barbeque, including the popular smoker plate. The pork pibil is a source of particular pride at SanTan, as it is added to many entrees. Wilson considers the barbeque to be a personal favorite of his for pairing. “We try to pair our beers uniquely,” he commented. “For example, Mr. Pineapple goes surprisingly well with our barbeque dishes.”

On special occasions, SanTan hosts beer dinners at their Chandler pub. “We call them crafting an experience because we want customers to associate craft beer with craft food,” Wilson informed. “It can be almost magical in how the right pairing can create a totally different experience.” Reservations for these events go fast.

A passion for canning, distinguished seasonal offerings, and a love for beer and food pairing are three major reasons for SanTan’s success, but check them out for yourself. You are sure to find your own reasons for wanting to go back. As far as future plans, they intend to serve Drunken Sex Panther, the bourbon barrel-aged version, at the Strong Beer Festival on February 13. San- Tan hosts a brewers round table on February 16, the Brews Cruise bike ride on February 20 and a beer dinner during Arizona Beer Week. “We have no plans to slow down or sell out,” Wilson promised. “We are proud to be an Arizona brewery.”

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/It%27s+Easy+To+Be+A+Santan+Fan/2392227/289968/article.html.

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