Southwest Brewing News April/May 2011 : Page 1

The Gathering Place, Raspberries, Plums, and Cherries! Oh My! In a Beer? s r e e B Fr u i t ILLUSTRATIONS BY HANS GRANHEIM TUSTIN BREWING Company By David Mulvihill (L-R) Ricardo, Tibo, and James of Kokoman Fine Wines and Liquor in Pojoaque, N.M., show their extensive PHOTO BY TAMMY PLUYM selection of both domestic and imported fruit beers. O By Tammy Pluym One of the many pleasures of homebrewing is the freedom to create any type of beer that comes to mind, without regard to cost, time, or if anyone else will like the fi nished product. With that in mind, home-brewers have been tossing fruit into beer for decades. Bounty from gardens and orchards end up in mash tuns and fermenters around the world. A homebrewer in Georgia might have a prolifi c peach tree in the backyard while the brewer in Minnesota has an enormous rasp-berry bush on the back 40, and the brewer in Africa makes banana beer (seriously, made from bananas and sorghum). A homebrewer thinks “Free Fermentables!” and brewing experiments ensue. Commer-cially available beers containing fruit are a relatively new phenomenon, but one that is defi nitely on the rise. The Apple of My Ale A quick quiz for the read-er: Which of the following fruit is not used in a commercial brew? Peaches, raspberries, blueberries, apricots, elderberries, mangos, cherries, blackberries, pineapples, See Fruit Beers p. 4 Part of Tustin Brewing Company’s management team: (L-R) General Manager Matt Luckey, Owner Jason Jeralds, and Shift Manager Rachel Bowen with Tustin Brewing Co. in background. PHOTOS BY DAVID MULVIHILL In Ireland, a pub is much more than a place for libation. It is a community-gathering venue where people meet to share news, laugh, solve the world’s problems and have a good time -a destination because of its environment for family and friends. Fortunately, you won’t have to leave the country to experience this true meaning of pub. All this and more awaits you in Tustin, California. While working at Huntington Beach Brewing Company in the early 1990s, Jason Jeralds had a vision of opening up a neighborhood I INSIDE State by State News Event Calendar .......................2 From the Editor .......................3 Best of Show ...........................5 Business of Beer ....................8 Directories & maps ..........12-15 Arkansas ....................8 Oklahoma ...................9 N Mexico/SW TX ......10 S California ..............16 San Diego .................17 S/C Texas .................18 Austin .......................19 N Texas .....................20 Nevada .....................21 C Arizona..................22 N Arizona..................23 S Arizona ..................23 brewpub he could make his own. Partnering with Peter Andriet and other worthy investors, that vision became reality in August of 1996. Tustin Brewing Company quickly developed a local following. Its recipe for success included a friendly front-of-the-house staff, knowledgeable brewer, and respectable kitchen team providing good food and house-made beer in a welcoming atmosphere. While discussing his business strategy, Jeralds shared, “I thought about making this a more upscale place, but didn’t want to make See Tustin p. 6

Fruit Beers

Tammy Pluym

One of the many pleasures of homebrewing is the freedom to create any type of beer that comes to mind, without regard to cost, time, or if anyone else will like the finished product. With that in mind, homebrewers have been tossing fruit into beer for decades. Bounty from gardens and orchards end up in mash tuns and fermenters around the world. A homebrewer in Georgia might have a prolific peach tree in the backyard while the brewer in Minnesota has an enormous raspberry bush on the back 40, and the brewer in Africa makes banana beer (seriously, made from bananas and sorghum). A homebrewer thinks “Free Fermentables!” and brewing experiments ensue. Commercially available beers containing fruit are a relatively new phenomenon, but one that is definitely on the rise.

The Apple of My Ale

A quick quiz for the reader: Which of the following fruit is not used in a commercial brew? Peaches, raspberries, blueberries, apricots, elderberries, mangos, cherries, blackberries, pineapples,coconuts, apples, guava, kiwi, papaya, oranges, black currents, limes, loganberries, kumquat, strawberries, pears, grapes or plums? OK, that was a trick question. They are all used in at least one commercially available bottled beer. Try to find a fruit not used in a commercial beer!

Easy as Cherry Ale

Why would a brewer add something like a bucket of cherries to a beer? Fruit, such as cherries, adds another dimension to the aroma and appearance of a beer, along with the flavor, which adds to the overall sensory enjoyment of the beverage. And that is, of course, the entire point of drinking a beer. The Belgians were the first to distribute fruit beers in the form of sour lambics flavored with raspberries, sour dark cherries, and black currents among other fruits in the early part of the 20th century. It’s not surprising that the Belgians were the first to popularize new and unusual ingredients in a beer. What is surprising is that it took most of the century for the rest of the world to follow suit.

Fruit can be added to beer in many forms, depending on the different factors important to the homebrewer or the commercial brewer, such as availability, cost, and the local beer consumer market. Fresh, frozen, purée, juice and fruit extracts have their pros and cons. Fresh fruit is plentiful and cheap when in season, but very ripe fruit must be used and the fruit must be crushed to extract the flavors and sugars. Frozen fruit is cheaper in the off-season compared to fresh, and freezing explodes the cell walls to expose the sugars to fermentation, so crushing is not necessary. Fruit purée can be purchased in bulk and is easily added to large batches of beer. Extracts and juice are the most economical method of adding fruit flavors to beer, but they can have more of a one-dimensional flavor compared to the other forms.

Most brewers add the fruit to the secondary fermenter during the brewing process. The active yeast, alcohol, and acidic environment of the secondary should prevent the survival of any unwanted bacteria or wild yeast added with the fruit. More intense fruit flavors can be produced during the secondary fermentation versus earlier in the process. Extracts can be added at bottling time since they do not contain fermentables. Some brewers steep the fruit in the hot wort directly after the boil, but extraction efficiency can be low and fruit is wasted. Fruit can also be added during the mash, however aromas and flavors can be lost in the subsequent boil.

Berry Nice

Many commercially bottled fruit beers are American wheat ales or light lagers. The light body of these beers can be used to highlight the fruit flavors in a crisp, and slightly acidic, refreshing summer brew. The variety of base beer used in fruit beer offerings is expanding every day, though. Examples are Rubus Blask, a blackberry imperial porter from Brau Brothers Brewing Company in Lucan, Minn., and Frambozen, a raspberry brown ale from New Belgian Brewing Company in Fort Collins Colo.

Brewpubs frequently offer fruit beers available only on tap or in growlers. The brewing techniques and base beers for these offerings are incredibly varied and imaginative. High Desert Brewing Company in Las Cruces, N.M., serves Peach Wheat yearround. Owner Bob Gosselin uses natural fruit extract in the finished wheat beer to create a brew that frequently medals at the New Mexico State Fair Pro-Am competition. Eske’s Brew Pub in Taos, N.M., brews Dead President’s Cherry Delight annually for Presidents’ Day. This light ale is brewed with cherry and raspberry purées for flavor, and blueberry and blackberry purées for color. The head brewer from Blue Corn Brewery in Santa Fe, N.M., Brad Kraus, was just at a brewery in Chile as a consultant and they created Mango Beer. Brad describes the process: “We brewed a special beer to enhance the fruit flavor, one most like a cream ale in style. The fruit will be added once the fermentation is almost complete to preserve the aromatic components of the fruit. A second, short fermentation is expected, then the fermenter is cooled and the beer is on the fruit for about a week before being filtered. As much yeast and pulp will be drawn off as possible to aid in filtration. The resulting beer will have the aroma, flavor, and even a little color of the mango.” Rod Tweet, president and head brewer at Second Street Brewery in Santa Fe, N.M., just put Sour Cherry Brown ale on tap as part of their Belgian Beer Series. Rod reports, “[This beer is] a couple of firsts for us; we sour mashed it this time [24-hour mash rest to develop some lactic character in the wort], and we added 120 lbs. Of Oregon Bing Cherries to the primary fermenter. We fermented it with a Chimay-like yeast strain and it’s about 15 IBUs from some 2.5% alpha CZ Saaz.” There is always a fruit wheat beer on tap at Three Rivers Brewery in Farmington, N.M., rotating between raspberry, peach, blackberry and tart cherry. Head Brewer, Peter Fieweger, has also created Raspberry Imperial Stout that was very well received and quickly gone.

It might take a few years before TV commercials feature cowboys watching football and drinking raspberry wheat beers, but with the way fruit beers are gaining popularity it could be sooner than you think!

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/Fruit+Beers/688579/65989/article.html.

The Gathering Place, TUSTIN BREWING Company

David Mulvihill

In Ireland, a pub is much more than a place for libation. It is a community-gathering venue where people meet to share news, laugh, solve the world’s problems and have a good time - a destination because of its environment for family and friends. Fortunately, you won’t have to leave the country to experience this true meaning of pub. All this and more awaits you in Tustin, California.

While working at Huntington Beach Brewing Company in the early 1990s, Jason Jeralds had a vision of opening up a neighborhood brewpub he could make his own. Partnering with Peter Andriet and other worthy investors, that vision became reality in August of 1996. Tustin Brewing Company quickly developed a local following. Its recipe for success included a friendly front-of-the-house staff, knowledgeable brewer, and respectable kitchen team providing good food and house-made beer in a welcoming atmosphere.

While discussing his business strategy, Jeralds shared, “I thought about making this a more upscale place, but didn’t want to make it unapproachable. I want to be a pub with good beer; a place people are comfortable coming to (and coming back to).” Tvs throughout the restaurant, along with two large screen projections, provide sports fans easy enjoyment of most sporting events. A full bar provides choices for the non-beer drinker.

Community

Supporting and giving back to the community is very important to TBC. They sponsor school, softball and little league teams, and the Tustin Street Fair Chili Cookoff. Their largest fundraiser, the Annual Tustin Brewery Charity Golf Classic, benefits the John Wayne Cancer Institute, and was developed to honor Jeralds’ father who passed away from cancer. TBC also assists the Tustin Police Department with their Santa Cop program by collecting toys at Christmastime.

So, in the recent climate of economic hard times, what has kept Tustin Brewing Company going and growing? Expanding the community and making it a destination for more than just the locals has been at the forefront. Beginning in early 2008, a rotating list of guest craft beers and Belgian beers were introduced to complement TBC’s line. Beer enthusiasts now count on Tustin to be their craft beer destination, where other fantastic brews can also be enjoyed: beers from Stone, Port, Russian River, Green Flash, Avery, and Bear Republic, to name a few. The other major blessing came in the form of a young ambitious brewer named Jonathan Porter.

Porter’s story has similarities to other homebrewers that have taken the professional leap (see sidebar next page). Porter started homebrewing in 2003, becoming obsessed with the every aspect of brewing and developing professional aspirations. After completing the American Brewers Guild course in June of 2006, he assisted a number of Southland breweries before taking an entry-level keg washing position at BJ’s Brea. From Brea, Porter transferred to BJ’s Oxnard. Under the tutelage of David Griffiths (now Brewer/ Co-Owner of Ladyface Ale Companie), Porter honed his craft on a professional scale. In late 2008, exiting TBC brewer Andy Lapworth recommended Porter as his replacement.

Making His Mark

Jonathan Porter approaches brewing analytically and meticulously. Upon arrival at Tustin, Porter began revamping the regular house beers, truing them to the styles their names imply, improving taste, balance and character. Recognition came quickly, in the form of increased patronage and GABF accolades. After his first win in 2009 for Golden Spike Light Ale, Jeralds freed the reins for Porter to experiment with seasonals, casks and specialty ales. Porter was now able to show his stuff in these areas as well, brewing hoppy IPAs, imperial IPAs, stouts (nitro and CO2), and Belgian-style ales. Appreciatively referring to Jeralds’ confidence in him, Porter remarked, “He’s my biggest fan!” Jeralds was quick to affirm that Porter’s beer has become a key driving force in the business and family that is Tustin Brewing Company. GABF honors came again in 2010 for Blimp Hangar Porter.

Jeralds’ talented management team and staff of 35 also contribute greatly to TBC’s ongoing success. Sharing the helm is General Manager Matt Luckey who assures the ship continues to sail most evenings and weekends.

TBC’s barrel program (prominently on display along the wall as you enter the pub) began with bourbon and rye whiskey barrel-aged barleywines. To express his wilder side, Porter recently procured red and white wine barrels from a premier Santa Rosa winery. The barrels were filled with Belgian-style pale and blonde ales and a custom blend of wild bugs (brett/lacto/ lambicus) from White Labs was added to nibble away. To monitor the maturation process, Porter has adopted a method many barrel brewers are utilizing to test the beer without introducing outside air or yeasts. Each barrel’s end was carefully drilled (prior to filling) and a small spiral nail sunk just enough to seal the hole. At sampling time the nail is pulled free, allowing the beer to stream into a testing glass. The nail is pushed back in, safely resealing the cask. Guests can look forward to sampling these wild brews by early next year.

One would think that brewing at the pub all day would be enough to curtail the brewing obsession of a typical brewer. Far from typical, Porter continues his craft at home. “As a homebrewer, I’ve probably got over 1,000 brews under my belt,” Porter shared this as he spoke about the advantage he feels homebrewing has given him in advancing as a professional brewer. This year, with full brewing regimen at work, wife and baby at home, Porter has still managed seven homebrew batches.

Future Aspirations

Both Jeralds and Porter have visions for the future that include developing a partnership that will allow them to fulfill additional dreams. Having recently secured a distribution license, circulation of Tustin Brewing Company beer to other restaurants, pubs, and venues around the community is on the horizon. Current capacity will allow them to increase from the 750-barrel production realized in 2010 to 1,250 barrels before additional facilities will be required. Possible plans may also include a side project - a specialty craft brewing venture.

Expansion plans aside, Jeralds is quick to point out that his primary objective is continuing to offer a place for people to gather - a comfortable place to enjoy great beer.

Read the full article at http://swbnonline.brewingnews.com/article/The+Gathering+Place%2C+TUSTIN+BREWING+Company/688580/65989/article.html.

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